Frequently Asked Questions

Blended learning is a blend of online learning and traditional face-to-face learning, with one enhancing the other. Online learning enables students access to courses from a remote location, freeing teachers and students from face-to-face meeting requirements. Blended learning is a flexible approach to the design, development and delivery of learning and teaching. Instruction may occur in the classroom, online or in both settings. A blended learning approach is student-focused, with the potential to offer a more robust educational experience.

Advantages of blended learning:

  • enables flexibilty in course design and delivery
  • enables flexibility of access to course materials, activities and assessments
  • supports synchronous and asynchronous learning
  • can help students develop independent learning skills

 

There are a few different ways you can obtain access to the software listed on this site; some are for free, while others you will need to purchase a licence yourself or through your school. For details on specific software, please refer to the Getting Started tab on the individual tool page. 

The easiest way to access the following software for free is to use the UNSW Media Room, which is located in room 237 in the AGSM Building on the Kensington Campus. In order to get access to this room, you must first complete an orientation session. For details on this, please visit this site: Support for Blended Learning.

The Medicine Media Room has the following software available:

  1. Adobe Production Suite (Premiere, After Effect, Auditions, Photoshop & Illustrator)
  2. TechSmith® Camtasia & Snag it
  3. Adobe® Presenter (PowerPoint plugin)
  4. iSpring Suite 8
  5. Adobe® Captivate
  6. Articulate Storyline 2
  7. Ink2Go
  8. Audacity
  9. Windows Movie Maker

Another approach is to use open sourced software available and install them on your computer for free. If your UNSW computer is SOE (Standard Operating Environment) computer, then you will need to make a request from UNSW IT to install the software for you. Follow this link for more details: IT Service Centre.

If you would like to have access to a paid licence software on your own computer, you will need to make a funding request to your head of school.

More detailed information regarding how to access the individual tools can be found in the tools pages.

There are several software packages available for your access in the UNSW Media Room, which is located in room 237 in the AGSM Building on the Kensington Campus. In order to get access to this room, you must first complete an orientation session. For details on this, please visit this site: Support for Blended Learning.  

The Medicine Media Room has the following software available:

  1. Adobe Production Suite (Premiere, After Effect, Auditions, Photoshop & Illustrator)
  2. TechSmith® Camtasia & Snag it
  3. Adobe® Presenter (PowerPoint plugin)
  4. iSpring Suite 8
  5. Adobe® Captivate
  6. Articulate Storyline 2
  7. Ink2Go
  8. Audacity
  9. Windows Movie Maker

This will depend on the type of software you want to purchase. For details on specific software please refer to the Getting Started tab on the individual tool page.

UNSW-owned devices should place a Service Request via the IT Service Centre. For a detailed list of the software provided by UNSW IT, please click HERE.

For software not supported by UNSW IT, such as Camtasia or iSpring Suite, you will need to purchase the software directly from the provider. Please view the links provided in the Getting Started tab.

Recommendation: Download a trial licence first to test out the software prior to purchasing it to make sure it's the right product for you.

UNSW Australia has a licence to Lynda.com where you can obtain a wide range of free training resources on different software. Through Lynda.com you can learn how to use the software, anywhere from basic foundational skills to the more advanced techniques.  

You can access Lynda.com HERE using your UNSW zID and password. 

Note: In addition to the software training, you can also get training on Blended Learning, Educational Technology, Foundations of Teaching with Technology.

 

SCORM stands for 'Sharable Content Object Reference Model'. It is a collection of technical standards and specifications developed for eLearning software products. SCORM defines a specific way of constructing online learning content so that it works well with other SCORM conformant systems. In short, it enables interoperability, accessibility and reusability of web-based learning content. 

Content can be created using HTML, JavaScript, SWF files and (for non-technical users) SCORM authoring software. If you design eLearning content using tools such as Adobe Captivate or Camtasia and you want to upload that content to an LMS such as Moodle, SCORM enables you to do that. Content can be created in an eLearning authoring tool such as those mentioned above, and then published by the tool in a SCORM conformant way. When published to SCORM, it just looks like a Zip file to the user. However, the Zip package contains all the files needed to make that eLearning content run and because it has been packaged up in line with SCORM standards, it is ready to be uploaded in to any SCORM-compliant LMS and then delivered out to learners.

For further information, follow this link: SCORM Explained.

Moodle does not create SCORM content. It delivers SCORM content to students and saves data from student interactions with the content. You must first create a SCORM package and then add it to Moodle.

To create a package, you can:

  1. Hand-code SCORM content using HTML, JavaScript and sometimes SWF files.
  2. (for non-technical users) Use SCORM authoring software.

For more information about how to create SCORM content, follow this link: Creating SCORM content.

[NOTE: A collection of existing SCORM packages can be found on Moodle.net].

Once you have created a SCORM package, you just need to drag and drop it into Moodle. For a step-by-step guide on how to load a SCORM package to Moodle, follow this link: Add an Activity in Moodle as a SCORM package.

If you have experience with a tool that is not included in this toolkit, or would like more information about a tool that is not featured, you can:

  1. Add a comment in the comments section. Please follow this link: Comments.
  2. Contact Nalini Pather at n.pather@unsw.edu.au

A screencast is a digital video and audio recording of what occurs on a computer screen. The presenter records all the screen activity and audio can be recorded simultaneously, or afterwards in postproduction. They are an easy to use multimedia alternative to video recording. 

Screencasts are an effective learning resource. Any instructional activity performed on a computer screen can be recorded. They are an effecient means of describing a step-by-step process, explaining a concept or presenting a PowerPoint presentation with narration. They can be watched by students at anytime, anywhere and at their own pace giving them more control over their learning experience. 

For a more detailed explanation, examples of how to use screencasting for teaching and further information on available software, please click HERE.

Interactive video is a type of digital video that supports an element of interaction through gestures, voice, touch or clicks. Audience members are participants and their interaction is vital to the experience.

Video is a foundational tool for e-Learning, and the addition of interactivity adds to its power. An advantage interactive video has over traditional video, which requires no input from the audience, is that it allows for frequent testing. Quizzes can be integrated into the video immediately following new information. The integration of testing into the video provides students with immediate feedback about their understanding and reports can be generated so that the teacher is able to assess where more support is needed. 

You do not need a professional recording studio to be able to recording high-quality audio. Thanks to advances in technology, professional-level audio recording is now within reach. In order to record good quality audio, you need to:

  1. Choose a good microphone: If you do not have a microphone of your own, a Rode mic is available for use in the UNSW Medicine Media Room, which is located in room 237 in the AGSM Building on the Kensington Campus. In order to get access to this room, you must first complete an orientation session. For details on this, please visit this site: Support for Blended Learning
  2. Choose an editing software: Once you have recorded the audio, you will need to edit the files to clean it up. An audio editing software will help you to get rid of any mistakes, improve the sound quality, reduce background audio, etc. We recommend using one of the following: Audacity, Adobe Audition or Garage Band

For more tips on how to record high quality audio, the following links are recommended:

  1. Top 7 Tips for Better Audio Recording
  2. 4 Simple Tips for Recording High Quality Audio
  3. How to Record High Quality Sound with your Phone